estate planning

Estate Planning: Don’t Forget Your Pet!  

If you are part of the 68 percent of U.S. households that own a pet[1], you probably think of it as a true member of the family—one you love and cherish. But what would happen to that cherished family member if you were to die suddenly? Have you taken any steps to ensure the family dog, cat, horse or other animal will be well taken care of if it outlives you?

If not, it’s probably time to think about how to make your treasured pet part of your estate plan. Even if you do have a plan, it might make sense to review and revisit it to ensure it’s still on track.

Here are some key steps to take and resources that can help.

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Estate Planning: Don’t Forget Your Pet!

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

Important Conversations for Family Gatherings

How you can help your family unlock its ‘soul capital’

Key Takeaways:

  • A legacy conversation is a frank discussion in which the older and younger generations share their views about what really matters to them.

  • Show and tell is a good technique for getting families to reveal their values in action.

  • Combining “soul capital” with financial capital will help families clarify their core values.


Now is the time of year when many extended families get together for some R&R at a family vacation home. While the bonding and elaborate meals can be great, living in close quarters, even for just a few days, can strain relationships among even the closest of families.


Throughout the course of our work with successful families empathy has been central to our practice. Empathy is about “feeling with” another person.

“Walk a mile in my shoes” is the old adage and listening—is one of the most important ways to do that. We spend so much time texting, tweeting and multi-tasking today, that listening has become almost a lost art. But, when someone listens to you, I mean REALLY listens, there is nothing like it. The rapt attention someone pays to you is a blessing and a gift. To be heard, seen and validated is a true gift.

All family members need empathy. Renowned psychologist Carl Rogers called this “unconditional positive regard.” It is the deepest form of acceptance.

When a family needs to address legacy issues, it’s important to be honest with each other about what really matters. For a family to do this there needs to be empathy.

When I was a kid in school, my favorite activity was show and tell. To bring some special personal object in to share with my classmates was a sheer joy. I also loved hearing about my classmates’ objects and the stories that filled my imagination. Each time, I learned something new, unique and often intimate about my classmates. And of course, when it was my turn, I beamed.

Talking about what really matters


What is a legacy conversation? It is a conversation in which the older and younger generations sit together and talk about what really matters. What really matters is each other; the family relationships and the way the family relates to each other and loves each other.

Money and other family assets are important because they sustain the family into the future. These things can be seen as giving stability or causing instability, depending upon how the family is doing with itself. If the family is good, wealth is good. If the family is not good, wealth can make it worse. So the show-and-tell notion related to legacy conversations has to do with honestly sitting together and talking about who we are, how we are and what we have. The family elders tell the stories about how they got here. They inform the “middlers” and the “youngers” what worked for them and what didn’t.

These conversations become sacred conversations because they contain wisdom. I use the phrase “soul capital.” Wisdom is different from knowledge. Knowledge is information and wisdom is deep and painstakingly won insight.

Wisdom is unique and particular to each family since every family dynamic is different. So when these kinds of conversations are held, they become sacred, as spiritual capital represents something bigger than the self and family—something that guides and protects us.

Legacy conversations are “show and tell” events as well. When grandfather and grandmother are sharing at a family gathering, the stories they tell are often gems from their past. Show and tell is a ritual that reveals a family’s values in action. As this sharing continues, the family begins to show and tell together. Over time, this simple sharing turns into what I believe to be sacred conversations. In these conversations lies true wealth.

Successful families that initiate and maintain conversations about legacy, values and related issues discover deep treasure. Why is it that most families don’t hold conversations like this? In a word: intimacy. When we become intimate with each other, we reveal. Vulnerability is uncomfortable.

Discomfort creates anxiety or pain. The paradox is that when a family is courageous enough to delve into these kinds of conversations, the discomfort passes over time, and what a family and its individual members find is unity. With family unity, anything is possible.

The soul capital of a family


Legacy conversations are sacred because they contain stories from the elders, middlers and newers that carry the “soul” capital of a family. Soul capital married with financial capital clarifies and empowers families to live their core values truly. Sacred conversations lead to true family flourishing.

I use the phrase “sacred conversations” because of the depth that lives in the inner world of family. At the core is love. Love is sacred; it is divine. In essence what lies in waiting for prosperous families is a different kind of wealth—soul capital.

Conclusion


When a family engages in family meetings to address legacy questions, it is good to begin with show and tell. Simple storytelling captures the essence of what brought a family to have a legacy to pass on.

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

Do I Qualify for Social Security Disability Benefits?

Social Security can provide benefits long before you are at Full Retirement Age (FRA) if you are disabled.  In order to qualify for Social Security disability benefits, you must have paid into Social Security (typically 10 years, but situations can vary).  Read on to see if you qualify for disability benefits.

Are you legally blind?

If you answered “yes” and earn less than $2,040 per month, you may qualify for full or partial benefits.  In order to see what your potential benefit might be, you must apply.  Wage earners who make more than $2,040 per month will not qualify for any benefits.  If you are not legally blind, move on to the next question.

Do you make more than $1,220 per month?

If you earn more than $1,220 per month, you will not be eligible for Social Security disability benefits.  If you earn less, move on to the next question.

Did you pass the “Recent Work Test” and the “Duration of Work Test”?

If you passed the two aforementioned tests and have been limited in your ability to do basic work (lifting, sitting, walking, or remembering) and are unable to perform gainful employment, you may be eligible for Social Security disability benefits.  You will have to apply to know for sure.  If you did not pass the tests, move on to the next question.

Are you a widow or surviving divorced spouse of a worker?

If you answered “yes” and are between ages 50 and 60 and your disability started within 7 years of the spouse’s death, you may qualify for benefits.  You will have to apply for benefits to see what your benefit might be.  If you answered “no”, then you will not qualify for any disability benefits.

 

Collecting Social Security disability benefits is complicated, and there are a lot of different requirements.  Check out this flowchart to learn more.

If you would like to schedule a call to talk about the best strategies for Social Security, please give us a call at 303-440-2906 or click here to schedule a time to speak with us.

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

This Powerful New Tax Strategy Is a TRIP

Key Takeaways

  • Total Return Pooled Income Funds (TRPIFs) can be powerful tools for gifting, estate planning and minimizing taxes.

  • TRPIFs allow you to make gifts of cash, publicly traded stock, closely held C Corps, unleveraged real estate, tangible personal property like art, cars, antiques and even LLC interests.

  • TRPIFs have many similarities to charitable remainder trusts, but it’s important to understand the differences. Always consult with your financial advisors before signing on the dotted line.

Now that your tax returns are hopefully completed I thought I’d share with you one of the best kept secrets in estate planning and tax mitigation. It’s been around since 1969, but most successful taxpayers and their advisors still don’t know about it.

How about a strategy that completely eliminates capital gains tax, provides a gigantic income tax deduction, distributes all its income (maybe for three generations) and is completely legal? Sounds too good to be true. Well it’s not. Here’s why:

The Pooled Income Fund (PIF), created in code section §642(c)(5) in 1969, and long the red headed step child of planned giving tools, has gone “beast mode.” Thanks to a perfect storm of low interest rates, technology and charities now understanding the need to be responsive to CPAs and other professional advisors (and donors) has ushered in a new type of PIF called the Total Return Pooled Income Fund (TRPIF). This vehicle is one of the most flexible, powerful and thought-provoking planning tools you can deploy.

Yet not many advisors and philanthropically-minded individuals know about them.

With a TRPIF, you may make gifts of cash, publicly traded stock, closely held C Corps, unleveraged real estate, tangible personal property like art, cars, antiques and even LLC interests. Income can be paid for one, two or three generations of income beneficiaries if they’re alive at the time of the gift. Competitive TRPIFs pay out all rents, royalties, dividends and interest as well as all short-term gains and up to 50 percent of post-gift realized long term gains.

Charitable beneficiaries are decided on by the donor, not by the TRPIF trustee. That means the donation goes to any charities the family feels are worthy.

If you know a little bit about CRTs you’ll find that TRPIFs are similar. However, you and your advisor should be aware of some important differences. For instance, a donor can’t be the trustee of his or TRPIF as they can with their CRT. That may be a drawback. However, young donors (couples in their 40s), for instance, can’t even qualify for a CRT as they won’t meet the 10 percent remainder test. With a TRPIF, there is no such test. That means an income beneficiary can be any age. The charitable income tax deductions of a TRPIF can be greater than a CRT’s by a magnitude of four or five times. The methodology by which a new TRPIF (less than three years old) calculates its income tax deduction is governed by a complicated formula based on the ages of the beneficiaries and the assigned discount rate (1.4% for 2018). This is what produces the large deductions.

Conclusion

From a planning standpoint, TRPIFs can allow you much more planning flexibility than many other trusts. When selling a low basis security, for instance, it may be possible to leave more shares in the seller’s hands and still pay no tax because of the larger income tax deduction. And, low-basis assets are only one of the many opportunities that you may applicable to the TRPIF strategy. There are only a small handful of charities offering this new, competitive, Pooled Income Fund. Therefore, it’s important that you ask a lot of pointed questions to the charity.

 

DISCLAIMER: The views expressed in this article do not necessarily express the views of our firm and should not be construed as professional tax advice.

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

 

 

 

Life Never Stops Changing

Neither do your giving and financial decisions


Key Takeaways

  • The most impactful gifts are often the result of personal tragedy or triumph.

  • We spend so much of our lives in the wealth accumulation phase that it’s easy to forget the positive impact that our money can have on others.

  • An astute advisor not only helps you optimize your investments, cash flow and wealth protection, but your legacy as well.

Meetings with your financial advisors bring to mind thoughts of balance sheets, net worth statements, stock options, investments, insurance policies and employee benefits. While these documents tell your various advisors what you have, they don’t tell them who you are, what you want or what truly motivates you.

I’ve learned over the years that after gaining a client’s trust, and after carefully opening the door to their personal side, we find out what truly makes them tick and what shapes the lens from which they see the world.

Often we come across tremendous stories of tragedy and triumph (or both). These are pivotal moments in an individual’s background – typically turning into a focus for future action. And sometimes that action is philanthropic – one that highlights the triumph or attempts to solve the problem that caused the tragedy.

For instance, a daughter’s death at the hands of a drunk driver left a family with such a need for a voice that Mothers Against Drunk Driving (M.A.D.D.) was brought into existence. Today, M.A.D.D. is the largest advocacy group in the country focused on preventing individuals from driving while intoxicated – its existence motivated by a heartbreaking loss.

Everyone deals and reacts to adversity in their own way – we must understand and accept that.

While tragedy is one side of the equation, there are also triumphs to celebrate – easier to discuss and just as big a motivation. Many years ago I worked with an extremely wealthy individual who kept telling me that he wasn’t charitable and that he didn’t really care about much of anything. He went on at length about how he was “self-made” and had come from nothing.

It wasn’t until when he revealed that he’d been raised in an orphanage that I realized how critical the orphanage had been to his upbringing and success. Today, that orphanage is endowed by a large gift by my client. It not only represents his personal victory, but an acknowledgment to the people who helped him triumph over his circumstances.

For some, it may be a coach, teacher or program that launches a successful athletic or academic career. It may be the person who helped you discover that you were good at math or the person who took the time to elicit your musical genius when no one else could see it. By doing so, we may discover a desire to make a gift, to return the favor, to pay it forward.

Life Never Stops Changing

Change is an inevitable part of life. We start new jobs, we send kids off to college, we lose a parent or gain a grandchild. Change can be daunting – but viewed through a different lens, it presents opportunity to raise the important questions about philanthropy.

In many circumstances, philanthropy can be the best solution to the change that’s taking place – if only we think to ask our advisors how.

Let’s look at some major life changes and see where you and your advisor might discuss gift opportunities at the appropriate time.

Suppose you are approaching retirement. Let’s assume you are the major breadwinner of your household and you are also hoping to downsize. As ordinary income (your paycheck) ceases, the desire to convert dormant or low yielding assets into supplemental income normally increases. This may be an opportunity to reposition low-basis assets into a pooled income fund (PIF), a charitable remainder trust (CRT) or even a gift annuity. Furthermore, the downsizing might free up additional capital with which to consider similar split interest gifts.

The birth of a grandchild may inspire a fund for college education. You can go the traditional 529 route or consider certain types of CRTs that turn into income in 18 years.

Widowhood is another significant life change that triggers emotional and financial upheaval, and often changes to family dynamics. If your late spouse was the main financial decision maker in your relationship, you may feel lost and frightened about the future. Perhaps the best solution is simplification and consolidation – taking multiple accounts and creating one large gift annuity, charitable trust or pooled income fund that delivers quarterly income. You should also examine gifts such as life estate agreements – which relieve the children of dealing with a house they usually don’t want anyway.

A serious illness is another major life change that brings a host of emotional and financial worries. But as you and your family delve into researching your loved one’s illness and treatment options, it can also motivate giving to support further research into curing or ameliorating that illness or disease.

Change is everywhere and change is constant. While some changes go unnoticed, others represent a prime turning point in our lives. We spend so much of our lives in the wealth accumulation phase that we sometimes forget the power our wealth can have to make lives better for others.

Conclusion

Just as an astute advisor can help you optimize your investments, cash flow and wealth protection strategies, he or she can also help you optimize the power of your giving.

All you have to do is email us or give us a call.

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

 

 

You Love Your Collection

Have you done the tax, estate and charitable math?

                                                                                                      
Key Takeaways

  • Collectibles are considered “tangible personal property” and are, therefore, taxed differently than other capital assets.

  • For collectibles, the long-term capital gains tax is at 28 percent (not 20 percent) as it is for stocks or real estate.

  • Gifting collectibles to charity requires a qualified appraisal and the recipients must be used for its charitable purposes. If not, you’ll have to take a less valuable deduction.

 

It is estimated that 30-percent of high net worth families collect art, antiques, coins, classic cars or other valuable assets that aren’t traded on an open exchange. Often referred to as passionate assets, they represent both a challenge and an opportunity for advisors and their clients.

Many enthusiasts don’t think of their collectables as they do their other assets – collectibles are loved, cherished, and coveted. They hold a meaning and identity that is incomparable to their economic value.

If you’ve ever been to a classic car show and stayed less than an hour, you did it wrong – to put it bluntly. Ask an owner about their gleaming, perfect specimen of a 1940 Duesenberg and you’ll get a detailed rundown of its history from the factory floor to present day, sparing no details in between. This is true for most collectors – be it toy trains, fine art or baseball cards.

That visceral connection is what makes planning for the “succession” of the collection so challenging. Yet, plan they must. Is the next generation even interested in the collection? Better find out. Who owns the collection? Better find that out, too. It’s the planner’s chance to make a huge difference in the final value to the family.

Tax considerations

VERY IMPORTANT: Collectibles are considered “tangible personal property” and are, therefore, taxed differently than other capital assets are. For collectibles, the long-term capital gains tax is at 28 percent, not 20 percent, like it is for stocks or real estate – that’s a significant bump. Furthermore, gifting your collectibles to charity gets complicated because you need a qualified appraisal of the collectible at the time of the gift. Further, the charity must be able to use the gift for its charitable purpose in order for the deduction to be at fair market value instead of the less valuable cost basis.

Proper planning can address these issues and you need to make sure your advisor can assist you properly, or have access to an expert specializing in this area. Keeping the collection in the family can be accomplished only with solid planning – as well as preventing a fire sale to create liquidity to pay estate taxes at the death of the collector.

What matters is aligning your goals for their collectibles with the tools and strategies that will accomplish them.

Make sure your advisors can help you with questions like these:

  • Do we use a pooled income fund to sell of the collection little by little?

  • Do we transfer to a private operating foundation and endow it with capital to keep the collection in the family?

  • Do we utilize monetized installment sales to defer capital gains tax for 30 years as we liquidate?

Any or all of these strategies may be applicable to your situation. If he or she hasn’t done so already, make sure you open the dialogue with your advisor(s) about your valuable collections.


Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail
info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

Diversified Asset Management, Inc. - 2018 4th Quarter Newsletter

This quarter’s newsletter is filled with lots of great information. Here is a list of topics included in this newsletter.

2018 Estate Tax Changes and What May Be Ahead

The tax code overhaul brought a lot of changes, but for the estate tax, the most far-reaching result was what didn’t happen. Chiefly, you didn’t lose capital gains break on inherited assets when they are sold.

Another Member of Music Royalty Dies With No Will

Legendary singer, Aretha Franklin succumbed to pancreatic cancer at the age of 76 on August 16, 2018, and she was accorded funeral rites reserved for music royalty. At once humble and a diva, the Queen of Soul, who famously demanded respect, sadly died without a will.

New Education Tax Breaks For A Child Or Grandchild

If you have a child or grandchild, for the first time ever, you can now pay tuition for kindergarten through 12th grade at private, public or religious schools with money saved in tax-advantaged 529 college savings accounts.

Qualifying For The New Business Owner Tax Break

Under the new tax law, business owners are entitled to deduct 20% of "qualified business income." The test for qualifying for a tax break on 20% of business income is defined in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) and summarized here along with a simple illustration.

Pre-Retirees To Convert To IRAs More Often

The tax burden of Americans was already among the lowest in the world, even before the tax cut that went into effect at the start of 2018. But the cost of Social Security, Medicare and borrowing are likely to force the U.S. government to raise tax rates in the years ahead.

Key Facts On Deducting Medical Expenses

Medical expenses can run up your expenses a lot. For that reason, the new tax law gives people a break by sweetening the long- time tax deduction for health care, at least for a couple of years.

To read the newsletter click on the link below:

Diversified Asset Management, Inc. - 2018 4th Quarter Newsletter

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

Tax Strategies for Retirees

Nothing in life is certain except death and taxes. —Benjamin Franklin

That saying still rings true roughly 300 years after the former statesman coined it. Yet, by formulating a tax-efficient investment and distribution strategy, retirees may keep more of their hard-earned assets for themselves and their heirs. Here are a few suggestions for effective money management during your later years.

Less Taxing Investments

Municipal bonds, or "munis" have long been appreciated by retirees seeking a haven from taxes and stock market volatility. In general, the interest paid on municipal bonds is exempt from federal taxes and sometimes state and local taxes as well (see table).1 The higher your tax bracket, the more you may benefit from investing in munis.

Also, consider investing in tax-managed mutual funds. Managers of these funds pursue tax efficiency by employing a number of strategies. For insta nce, they might limit the number of times they trade investments within a fund or sell securities at a loss to offset portfolio gains. Equity index funds may also be more tax-efficient than actively managed stock funds due to a potentially lower investment turnover rate.

It's also important to review which types of securities are held in taxable versus tax-deferred accounts. Why? Because the maximum federal tax rate on some dividend-producing investments and long-term capital gains is 20%.* In light of this, many financial experts recommend keeping real estate investment trusts (REITs), high-yield bonds, and high-turnover stock mutual funds in tax-deferred accounts. Low-turnover stock funds, municipal bonds, and growth or value stocks may be more appropriate for taxable accounts.

The Tax-Exempt Advantage: When Less May Yield More

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Which Securities to Tap First?

Another major decision facing retirees is when to liquidate various types of assets. The advantage of holding on to tax-deferred investments is that they compound on a before-tax basis and therefore have greater earning potential than their taxable counterparts.

On the other hand, you'll need to consider that qualified withdrawals from tax-deferred investments are taxed at ordinary federal income tax rates of up to 39.6%, while distributions—in the form of capital gains or dividends—from investments in taxable accounts are taxed at a maximum 20%.* (Capital gains on investments held for less than a year are taxed at regular income tax rates.)

For this reason, it's beneficial to hold securities in taxable accounts long enough to qualify for the favorable long-term rate. And, when choosing between tapping capital gains versus dividends, long-t erm capital gains are more attractive from an estate planning perspective because you get a step-up in basis on appreciated assets at death.

It also makes sense to take a long view with regard to tapping tax-deferred accounts. Keep in mind, however, the deadline for taking annual required minimum distributions (RMDs).

The Ins and Outs of RMDs

The IRS mandates that you begin taking an annual RMD from traditional IRAs and employer-sponsored retirement plans after you reach age 70½. The premise behind the RMD rule is simple—the longer you are expected to live, the less the IRS requires you to withdraw (and pay taxes on) each year.

RMDs are now based on a uniform table, which takes into consideration the participant's and beneficiary's lifetimes, based on the participant's age. Failure to take the RMD can result in a tax penalty equal to 50% of the required amount. TIP: If you'll be pushed into a higher tax bracket at age 70½ due to the RMD rule, it may pay to begin taking withdrawals during your sixties.

Unlike traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs do not require you to begin taking distributions by age 70½.2 In fact, you're never required to take distributions from your Roth IRA, and qualified withdrawals are tax free.2 For this reason, you may wish to liquidate investments in a Roth IRA after you've exhausted other sources of income. Be aware, however, that your beneficiaries will be required to take RMDs after your death.

Estate Planning and Gifting

There are various ways to make the tax payments on your assets easier for heirs to handle. Careful selection of beneficiaries of your money accounts is one example. If you do not name a beneficiary, your assets could end up in probate, and your beneficiaries could be taking distributions faster than they expected. In most cases, spousal beneficiaries are ideal, because they have several options that aren't available to oth er beneficiaries, including the marital deduction for the federal estate tax.

Also, consider transferring assets into an irrevocable trust if you're close to the threshold for owing estate taxes. In 2016, the federal estate tax applies to all estate assets over $5.45 million. Assets in an irrevocable trust are passed on free of estate taxes, saving heirs thousands of dollars. TIP: If you plan on moving assets from tax-deferred accounts, do so before you reach age 70½, when RMDs must begin.

Finally, if you have a taxable estate, you can give up to $14,000 per individual ($28,000 per married couple) each year to anyone tax free. Also, consider making gifts to children over age 14, as dividends may be taxed—or gains tapped—at much lower tax rates than those that apply to adults. TIP: Some people choose to transfer appreciated securities to custodial accounts (UTMAs and UGMAs) to help save for a grandchild's higher education expenses.

Strategies for mak ing the most of your money and reducing taxes are complex. Your best recourse? Plan ahead and consider meeting with a competent tax advisor, an estate attorney, and a financial professional to help you sort through your options.

Source(s):

1.  Capital gains from municipal bonds are taxable and interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax.

2.  Withdrawals prior to age 59½ are generally subject to a 10% additional tax.

*Income from investment assets may be subject to an additional 3.8% Medicare tax, applicable to single-filer taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of over $200,000, and $250,000 for joint filers.

Required Attribution

Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by DST Systems, Inc. or its sources, neither DST Systems, Inc. nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall DST Systems, Inc. be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber's or others' use of the content.

© 2017 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions.

 

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for com pensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other co ntent should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

When Protection Matters: Consider a QTIP Trust

Several years ago, Jack's father died. Jack grieved not only for his father's passing, but also for his widowed mother who had been married to Jack's father for 35 years. In due course, Jack's mother remarried. However, when she eventually passed away, Jack suffered a double loss: Jack not only lost his mother, but also most of his inheritance. Just the year before, she had given her second husband a substantial sum to start a new business.

Jack's father could have preserved Jack's inheritance, while at the same time providing for Jack's mother, with a qualified terminable interest property (QTIP) trust.

How It Works

With a QTIP trust, rather than simply leaving your assets to your spouse outright in your will, you specify that all or a portion of your assets should be transferred to the trust upon your death. The trustee you choose is legally responsible for holding and investing the assets as you provide. The QTIP trust pays your spouse a life income. After your spouse dies, your children (or anyone else you choose) will receive the trust principal. With a QTIP trust, your spouse cannot prevent the trustee from transferring the assets to your intended beneficiaries.

Current federal estate-tax law allows an unlimited marital deduction for assets that pass from one spouse to the other. To secure the deduction, assets generally must pass to the surviving spouse directly or through a qualifying trust. Thus, it's important to structure your QTIP trust so that the trust assets qualify for the marital deduction. This will allow your estate to avoid paying taxes on the trust property. The trust assets will be included in your spouse's gross estate for estate-tax purposes. However, your spouse's estate will be entitled to a unified credit that could eliminate some -- or perhaps all -- of the estate tax.

Problem Solver

Many estate planning decisions that are simple for traditional families can prove very complicated in today's age of multiple marriages and "blended families." There are many scenarios in which a QTIP trust can be used to prevent future problems. Consider a remarriage involving children from a former marriage. In this case, a QTIP trust can help control the ultimate disposition of assets. The trust also can be used when professional management of assets is desirable for the surviving spouse. After all, placing assets directly in the hands of a spouse who may lack investment or financial experience can be a costly mistake.

Inheritance Insurance

By setting up a QTIP trust, you make sure that your trust assets will eventually go to the individuals you choose to receive them. The result will be the same even if your spouse remarries, drafts a new will, or experiences investment losses. You'll be able to provide for your spouse and preserve assets for your children or other beneficiaries, regardless of how your family's circumstances may change.

Experience Is Essential

A problem-free QTIP trust requires an experienced professional trustee who can manage the trust for your surviving spouse and children in accordance with your wishes. Your financial advisor can help you secure the services of a qualified professional with experience administering QTIP trusts. Together, they can help to ensure that your assets are well cared for throughout the term of the trust.

This communication is not intended to be legal/estate planning advice and should not be treated as such. Each individual's situation is different. You should contact a qualified legal/estate planning professional to discuss your personal situation.


Required Attribution


Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by Wealth Management Systems Inc. or its sources, neither Wealth Management Systems Inc. nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall Wealth Management Systems Inc. be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber's or others' use of the content. 

© 2016 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions.


Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.
 


The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.