business strategy

The Generous Business

How you can use your business as an engine for generosity

Key Takeaways:

  • Giving interest in a business may enable owners to double their current cash giving, while dramatically reducing their tax liability.

  • Most business owners are not aware they can give a portion of their business to charity.

  • Giving an interest in a business generally has no adverse impact on the owners’ lifestyle, cash flow or capitalization of their business.

  

Hundreds of successful business owners throughout the country are discovering unique ways to use their businesses as engines for generosity. Take the Kuipers, for example.

Bill and Katrina Kuiper own and operate a pharmaceutical distribution company. The company produced about $1 million of net profit last year and was recently valued at $10 million. The business has grown by double digits from its inception 12 years ago, and it’s expected that the company’s performance will continue for the foreseeable future.

The Kuipers are a generous family that gives approximately $100,000 annually to various charities. In addition to supporting their local church, they are actively involved in local charities that support their city’s homeless community, and they have a deep passion for combating human rights abuses globally—especially human trafficking. They also give very generously of their time.

Considering their healthy annual income, Bill and Katrina live a relatively modest lifestyle. They live exclusively on the $200,000 salary that Bill receives from the company. Because of the high growth prospects the business has enjoyed from its inception, Bill has always reinvested most of his profits in the business. However, reinvestment has limited the Kuipers’ capacity for charitable giving. They would love to give more, but they simply lack the available cash resources with which to do so. Or so they thought.

Make charitable intentions go further

A savvy advisor recently shared a strategy with the Kuipers that allows them to increase their annual giving dramatically, even doubling their current cash giving, by using their most valuable financial asset—their business.

The Kuipers’ learned that they could gift a relatively small interest in their business each year to secure the maximum charitable deduction allowed under existing tax rules. Taxpayers may generally deduct up to 50 percent of their income each year through charitable contributions. If a gift is made in the form of a noncash asset such as a business or real estate, the charitable deduction is limited to 30 percent of income.

So the Kuipers’ decided to make a charitable gift of an interest in their business equal to $300,000, 30 percent of their business’s $1 million income. Based on the value of their business, this represented a gift of a 3 percent interest ($10 million divided by $300,000).

The gift was intentionally made to a donor-advised fund for two primary reasons:

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1. Because a donor-advised fund is classified as a public charity under the tax rules, Bill and Katrina receive a full fair-market-value deduction for their gift. Had they made a gift to a private foundation, their deduction would have been limited to their income tax basis in the business—which is quite low in comparison to the value of the business.

2. The donor-advised fund provides a mechanism allowing the Kuipers to make a single charitable gift but ultimately support numerous charities, as the donor-advised fund is merely a conduit to the end charities that the Kuipers support. Once the donor-advised fund receives cash—either from annual distributions of income from the business or proceeds from an eventual sale of the business—Bill and Katrina can then grant that cash from their donor-advised fund to any number of charities that they recommend.

Because Bill and Katrina are in the highest marginal tax bracket (45.6 percent combined federal and state), their gift provided a $300,000 charitable deduction saving $136,800 in taxes. The business interest gift increased their total annual giving from 10 percent to 40 percent of their income.

However, the Kuipers had an additional 10 percent of income that could still be offset by charitable contributions. Their advisor suggested they take a portion of the income tax savings that they had just realized from the business interest gift and make an additional cash gift that would be sufficient to use their remaining 10 percent deduction capacity. So Bill and Katrina made an additional cash gift of $100,000 from the $136,800 of tax savings. The additional cash gift also provided a charitable deduction, saving $45,600 more in taxes and taking their total giving to the maximum deductible amount, 50 percent of income.

The giving strategy described above had no adverse impact on Bill and Katrina’s lifestyle or on the capitalization and cash flow needs of their business. In fact, their cash flow actually increased due to the tax savings they realized. Despite the fact that the Kuipers gave $100,000 of the tax savings to charity, at the end of the day they still had $82,400 of additional cash flow from making these gifts—$36,800 after $100,000 of the initial tax savings from the business gift was made in the form of cash, plus $45,600 in tax savings from the subsequent cash gift.

Combining a vacation and mission

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Most of the $82,400 of increased cash flow was reinvested in their business. However, they did use a portion of it to fund a two-week combined vacation and mission trip to Africa that had an unexpected, transformational impact on their lives. In addition to experiencing the beautiful sights and sounds of Africa, including an unforgettable safari, they had a unique opportunity to meet their ”adopted“ daughter, 9-year-old Christina, whom they’ve supported for years through a child sponsorship program with an international charity that combats child poverty. The Kuipers’ trip marked the first time in over 12 years that Bill had taken a full two-week reprieve from the demands of running a successful business.

Bill and Katrina are planning to continue this pattern of giving each year. Another benefit of this strategy is that their wealth, as represented by their business, will actually increase over time. That’s despite giving additional gifts in their business. Because their business is growing at double digits each year, and because they are gifting an interest in their business of only 3 percent each year, the value of their retained ownership continues to increase. At the same time, the Kuiper’s charitable giving has increased dramatically, to 50 percent from 10 percent of their income.

Conclusion

The Kuipers’ greatest joy comes from witnessing the lives that are touched and transformed by the charities with which they partner. The business-interest strategy they’ve implemented has enabled them literally to double their support for their charitable endeavors. That’s because their current cash giving has correspondingly doubled as a result of giving a portion of the tax savings generated from their business-interest gift. The Kuipers are also excited about the fact that at some point in the future, when their business is sold or liquidated, very significant additional assets will be available to support the charities they care about. This is a result they had never imagined possible until a creative advisor shared with them how their business could be a powerful engine for greater impact and generosity.

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

Second Generation Owners Are Often Different from Founders

Smart business families recognize this and adjust their vision accordingly

Key Takeaways:

  • Founding business owners and their children often have differing management styles, communication styles and expectations.

  • Founders appreciate directness and simple solutions.

  • Founders’ children often need more sophisticated solutions in which emotional considerations are as important as the financial ones.


Most business owners I know fall into one of two camps—first generation business owners or later generation business owners. Business families and their advisors who don’t take the time to understand the differing management styles, communication styles and expectations often run into trouble down the road.

Starting a business is incredibly demanding

Starting a business is hard work. Many founders work for years—and against all odds—to create a business that succeeds. Ask any successful business owner who has been around for a decade or two—they’ve experienced countless ups and downs. Often the downs have put the owners on the brink of losing their business. But they never give up!

To make it through the challenging times, entrepreneurs have to be very tough and resilient. They will tell you exactly what they think. They don’t pull punches and expect you to do the same.


First-generation business owners have a thick skin

The good part about first-generation business owners is that you can say almost anything to them as long as you do so with respect. But you’d better be direct and avoid legalese, MBA-speak and fancy marketing terms. If you don’t, you probably won’t be taken seriously.

Second and third generation owners tend to take a more nuanced view of the business. They’re more open to outside ideas than founders tend to be. However, Next Gen owners often make the mistake of thinking that founders will take their advice and implement it without knowing how the advice fits in with the business’s long-term or even short-term goals. If you don’t spend time understanding what drives founders, there’s a good chance they’ll just ignore you or cut you off mid-sentence.

Sure, many founders are gruff. But don’t walk on eggshells around them. To gain the trust of founders, you must get right to the point. If you’re able to do this, working with founders becomes much easier and more enjoyable.

First generation owners aren’t only tough at the workplace

The drive, resiliency and thick skin that it takes to start and build a business is one of brutal honesty. If you’re not brutally honest with yourself, it’s too easy to find excuses for things not working out.

In my experience, first-generation business owners aren’t only tough at work; they’re very tough at home. First-generation owners tend to be tough on their children. Tough love rather than unconditional love is more often their style. The children of business founders often feel they are under the thumb of their parents. This is especially true if children of founders decide to join their parents in the family business.

Second-generation owners are a different story
For their first 25 or 30 years of life, founders’ children will tell you they heard nothing but criticism from parents who had no patience for their mistakes and no tolerance for excuses. There’s something to be said about the value of tough love when so much of parenting today borders on coddling and “helicoptering.” But, this often leaves founders’ children feeling inadequate, with a strong need to prove themselves.

When founders’ children finally get a chance to run the family business, they often have no patience for founders and other advisors telling them where they’re wrong. Instead, they expect their employees, customers, clients and advisors to tell them how wonderful they are and how brilliant their ideas are.

A successful relationship with second-generation owners often means being a cheerleader instead of a true thinking partner. Although second-generation owners start their business careers with a huge advantage over where their parents started, they often struggle to maintain its success, much less take it to the next level. Without accepting honest feedback, it’s just too easy for second-generation owners to take the company in directions that hurt more than help.


The conundrum of second-generation owners

On the flip side, working with second-generation owners can be fun if they’re willing to be coached. You need to feed them ideas in the form of questions and let them adapt your ideas as your own if needed. Don’t force your ideas down their throats, or you’ll just get pushback.


Well-educated second-generation owners may want to use advisors and consultants with prestigious academic degrees and career credentials—people that founders would never consider bringing in. On the surface, it may seem like second generation owners are injecting unnecessary complexity into the business, but it’s best to let NextGen figure that out on their own. As a founder, you can suggest some ways in which simpler is usually better, but don’t try to override the process.

Being blunt with second and third generation owners generally won’t work. You must remember where they came from. It’s not necessarily coddling, but you have to be open to the possibility that there could be a better way of doing things.

Conclusion

One final caveat—generalizations are often wrong. I’ve encountered more than a few (first-generation) founders who are open to new ideas, outside expertise and a more collaborative work environment. Likewise, I’ve worked with many founders’ children who are gruff, relentless and think only one ways of doing things—their way—is right. Be aware of generational predispositions and try to leverage the strengths of each generation’s work habits and management style. Your customers and clients will thank you, and family gatherings around the dinner table will be a lot less stressful.

Feel free to contact me any time if your family or a close friend or relative’s family is considering a leadership change in the family business.

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

Home Office Deductions

“Safe harbor” option may be easier, but number crunching is still worth it for many

 

Key Takeaways:

  • The IRS simplified option for home office deductions five years ago and million or taxpayers are taking advantage. Just be careful if you do.

  • This option can significantly reduce paperwork.

  • However, the annual limit is $1,500, and those with higher home office expenses may still be better off slogging through the detailed Form 8829.



According to the IRS, more than 3.4 million taxpayers claimed deductions totaling just over $9.6 billion for business use of a home, commonly referred to as the “home office deduction.”

Introduced in tax year 2013, the optional deduction is designed to reduce the paperwork and recordkeeping burden for small businesses. The optional deduction is capped at $1,500 per year, based on $5 a square foot for up to 300 square feet.

Back in 2013, the IRS announced a new, simplified method for claiming home office deductions. According to the IRS, this safe harbor method is an alternative to the existing requirement of calculation, allocation and substantiation of actual expenses, including mortgage payments and depreciation that is done in Form 8829.

Moreover, there is an annual limitation of $1,500 under this new method, thus making this a viable option for those with offices in apartments or smaller homes. Still, there is merit to understanding this option now and evaluating the best course for your business deductions.

Which method is best for me?

Before we look at the new option, let’s run through the existing method. The existing method involves several steps before you can arrive at the total for a home office deduction.

Step 1: Figure the percentage of your home used for business
Divide the total square footage of your home that you use for business by the square footage of your entire house. That percentage is what you’ll need for Step 3 below.

Step 2: Sum up all the expenses
This step involves the most paperwork. You need to list the various expenses such as rent and utilities or—in the case of ownership—mortgage interest, real estate taxes, insurance, repairs, utilities and the big one—depreciation. Lines 36 to 41 on Form 8829 involve going back and forth between the instructions several times to arrive at appropriate depreciation numbers.

Step 3: Apply the percentage from Step 1 to Step 2
You will use the percentage from Step 1 to figure the business part of the expenses for operating your entire home.

Now the new safe harbor option lets you claim a flat deduction of $5 per square foot of the home office, up to 300 square feet. That means if you use this method and have a home office of more than 300 square feet, you will be able to claim a maximum deduction of $1,500.

Some of the benefits of this method are:

  • You drastically reduce paperwork and compliance burden.

  • If you itemize deductions and use the safe harbor method, those expenses related to your home, such as mortgage interest and real estate taxes, can be itemized without allocating them between personal and business expenses.

  • You can choose either method from year to year depending on which one is beneficial in a particular year. A change from using the safe harbor method in one year to actual expenses in a succeeding taxable year or vice versa is not a change in your method of accounting and does not require the consent of the IRS.

Some of the limitations of this method are:

  • You are limited to claiming $1,500 per year irrespective of actual expenses incurred on the home office.

  • If you have a loss and cannot claim the entire deduction of $1,500 in a year, you cannot carry forward the home office expense to the following year. This would be possible if you claim actual expenses. Moreover, if you choose the safe harbor method, you cannot set off office expense carried forward from an earlier year.


The definition of what qualifies as a home office has not changed. In short, the home office

  • Must be used as your principal place of business.

  • It must be used “regularly and exclusively” for business

  • It cannot double as a place that you use for business as well as for personal purposes.

If you’re a professional, you may face various scenarios. You might be working from home for the most part of your practice, or you might be working from an office location but sometimes doing work at home. Each scenario is dealt with differently from a home office deduction point of view.

  • Home as your principal place of business: If you work from home for the most part of your business or practice, that is, you perform all important activities at this place and spend relatively more time there, then your home would be your principal place of business. In such a case, you can claim a deduction for the portion of your home that you use regularly and exclusively for your business.

  • Business at office location while doing some work at home: If you have separate office premises for conducting your business, then that would be your principal place of business. You cannot claim a deduction for use of your home during weekends or after office hours.

However, there is an important exception for professionals who also use their home for client meetings.

If you meet or deal with clients or customers in your home in the normal course of your business, even though you also carry on business at another location, you can deduct your expenses for the part of your home used exclusively and regularly for business if you meet both of these tests:

  • You physically meet with patients, clients or customers on your premises.

  • Their use of your home is substantial and integral to the conduct of your business.

The part of your home that you use exclusively and regularly to meet clients or customers does not have to be your principal place of business. Using your home for occasional meetings and telephone calls will not qualify you to deduct expenses for the business use of your home.

You and your tax advisor can make a decision regarding which method to choose, depending on a few pointers:

  • Do a back-of-the-envelope calculation of your home office expenses under both methods. Calculate the deduction under the safe harbor method by multiplying the area of your home office by $5 (limited to $1,500). If that is significantly less than the amount you claimed as a deduction in your most recent tax return, it might make sense to go through the trouble of filling out Form 8829.

  • If you have a loss from your business and would like to carry forward the home office expense, choose the actual expense method. If you have home office expenses from an earlier year that you would like to set off, use the actual expense method.

Conclusion

Claiming home office deductions is widely believed to be a common cause for an IRS audit. At the same time, genuine use of your home for business purposes can hand you a valuable deduction. The new method can significantly reduce paperwork and compliance burden for those with small home offices. But those with bigger spaces may want to choose the actual expense method. Cumbersome as it may seem, it might well be worth the effort.

DISCLAIMER: The views expressed in this article do not necessarily express the views of our firm and should not be construed as professional tax advice.

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

Smarter Business Exit Strategies

Too many business succession plans don’t work out as planned, but smart owners can get back on track and stay that way for the long-term.


Key Takeaways:

  • Most business owners create unnecessary risks for their families, employees and clients by failing to fund business succession plans.

  • Every business owner should establish a clear vision for his or her transition and look for ways to improve after-tax returns.

  • Business owners can reduce the costs of succession plans by 50 percent by using pre-tax dollars to pay for insurance.

 

Many successful entrepreneurs, especially Boomers, may be thinking that now is the right time to exit their businesses. Unfortunately, business transitions don’t usually go as smoothly as expected. The failure rate of succession plans is now at eyebrow-raising levels. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

What motivates most business owners to think about a business succession plan?

Scary stories about failed companies motivate business owners to consider implementing a business succession plan. Despite the obvious need, few plans are actually designed, drafted and funded properly. High professional fees and insurance costs often take the blame when business owners are asked why they did not implement a succession plan.

Why do so many succession plans miss the mark?

Most business succession plans fail. According to Harvard Business Review, only 30 percent of the businesses make it to Generation Two and a mere 3 percent survive to generate profits in Generation Three. Estate planning experts such as Perry Cochell, Rodney Zeeb and George Hester came up with similarly disappointing numbers. Given this dismal success record for family business transitions, it is no wonder that 65 percent of family wealth is lost by the second generation and 90 percent by the third generation. By the third generation, more than 90 percent of estate value is lost despite the efforts of well-meaning advisors. It does NOT have to be this way.

What is the biggest problem business owners face when they try to implement succession plans?

Unless a business succession plan addresses tax issues, company owners can lose much of their wealth to taxes on income, capital gains, IRD, gifts, estates and other taxes. In most successful businesses, the company will generate taxable cash flow that exceeds what is needed to fund the owner’s lifestyle. This extra cash flow is usually taxed at the highest top marginal state and federal income tax rates. When the after-tax proceeds are invested, the growth is subject to the highest capital gains rates. Ultimately, when the remaining assets are passed to family members or successor managers, there could be a 40 percent gift or estate tax applied.

How can owners and their advisors solve this tax problem?

Every business owner should establish a clear vision for his or her transition and look for ways to improve after-tax returns. Tax-efficient planning strategies are needed to guide decisions about daily operations and business exit strategies. An astute advisor can help you find ways to fund business succession agreements in ways that generate current income tax deductions while allowing the business to generate tax-free income for the business owner and/or successors.

What are some other ways to reduce taxes?

There are many tax-advantaged business succession techniques that give business owners a competitive edge. Qualified plans provide tax deductions in the current years, but they are not typically as tax-efficient for funding a buy-sell. More advanced planning strategies involving Section 79 and Section 162 plans can provide tax-free payments for the retiring executive or death benefits for family members, but limit the tax deductions when the plans are funded. There are very few options when owners seek up-front tax deductions, tax-free growth and tax-free payments to themselves and/or their heirs.

Bottom line

Advanced planning strategies allow business owners to fund business continuity plans more cost-effectively. Business owners should work with advisors who can design a plan that can convert extra taxable income into tax-free cash flow for retirement and/or the tax-free purchase of equity from the business owner’s estate.

Once the plan has been designed, experienced attorneys will draft legal documents to facilitate the tax-efficient plan funding. This integration of design, drafting and funding helps ensure effective implementation of the strategy as well as proper realization of benefits under a variety of scenarios. An experienced advisor should be able to help you quantify how planning costs are just a small fraction of the expected benefits. More important, these financial benefits bring peace of mind to the business owner, the owner’s family and to key executives. Great clarity and confidence results from having a business continuity plan that has been designed properly, drafted effectively and funded tax-efficiently.

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

 

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

Why You Need a ‘Business Plan’ for Your Family

When business owners start a new venture or seek out funding, they always create a detailed business plan first. But chances are, most parents have never once thought about creating a similar type of plan for their most important asset: their families.

 

Your family may not be a business, but clearly it can be a good idea to foster it like good business owners do with their companies. By taking steps to formally identify your family’s values and goals, as well as to assess the quality of the relationships you have with each other, you can start to strengthen existing bonds—and repair any bridges that are in bad shape. By actively working together toward family goals, you can instill greater resiliency, competency and life skills in your children.

 

Here’s why it’s so important to create family plans along the lines of highly successful business plans—along with actionable advice for creating these plans in your own life.

Click Here to Read More:

Why You Need a ‘Business Plan’ for Your Family

Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail info@diversifiedassetmanagement.com.

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.